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3 Ways to Improve Your Customer Service

Ways to improve customer serviceIf you've recently found yourself wondering, "How can I improve my business's customer service," this is a positive thought! As a business owner or manager, if you haven't been thinking about this, it's time to start. Improving your business's customer service encourages a positive company culture and provides your brand with the opportunity to capture and retain high-quality customers that, in return, become brand ambassadors when they have a great experience. This article shares a few simple tips and adjustments that you can make to improve customer service at your organization.

 

1. Empower Your Employees

In a customer service-based industry, it's important that your employees feel confident and proud of the knowledge they have about your brand and products. If an employee does not have the proper training, enabling them to confidently engage with and support the customer in need, they will not perform to their highest ability.

When employees don’t have high confidence, it can result in a negative or non-supportive message that is relayed to the customer. Training programs, team-building ventures, and success coaching are all affordable ways to give your employees the knowledge and confidence they need to succeed and handle customer service with care. These tactics will also help to improve employee engagement.

 

Employee Engagement Checklist

 

2. Allow Your Customers to Get to Know You

Decision makers are faced with more options than ever before. It’s likely that you are competing against other companies that offer the same or similar services/products. Increasingly, customers are buying online.

Creating opportunities for your potential customers to have real-life interaction, or at a least one-on-one conversation, with someone in your company can open the door for the building of trust and brand loyalty. Simply put, people like to feel important. When customers get to know employees, conversions and brand awareness increase.

 

3. Create a Community for Feedback

Although the task of creating an "online community" may fall under the role of the social media or community manager, it is an important asset that impacts the entirety of your company. According to Webbiquity, "84% of CEOs and VPs say they use social media to help make purchasing decisions." The creation and management of an online community not only enables you to inform a large number of users, but it also creates a space for honest feedback from prospects and customers.

Yes, from time to time you may get negative feedback or a bad review. With process in place to appropriately and proactively respond to these comments, however, your business’s customer service will be improved by "humanizing" your brand; you’ll gain the trust of others when they see that their experience and opinion matter. A negative situation, in most cases, can be converted into a positive client experience, making your customer service team look and feel great.

Improving your business's customer service activity may seem like an overwhelming or wasteful task. We can assure you this is far from true. There are a vast number of digital and physical outlets for customers to potentially tarnish your brand, and it's more important than ever before to have a community management team in place.

 

Learn More

It's powerful to know what your employees think! You can identify problems like poor supervision, communication breakdown, and mounting plans to leave your company before expensive turnover affects your business.
 
Use this checklist for a quick read on your employee engagement. 
 
Download FREE Employee Engagement Checklist
 

Tags: Customer Satisfaction, Employee Surveys, Business Customer Service, Improve Productivity, Business Change

Leila Zayed
As VP of Best Companies Group, Leila has established Best Places to Work programs, given talks on employee engagement topics all over the U.S., and launched our employee survey brand, Best Employee Surveys. Before joining Best Companies Group, Leila had been a publisher at Mainebiz, a research analyst at several great firms, and an avid gardener. (She can still be found digging in the dirt most mornings before the office opens.) She received her training in social research from the University of Vermont. Leila resides in Portland, Maine with her son, Henry, their cat, Phoenix, and their flock of six pampered suburban chickens.
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